Carol Wisker

Address137 Jefferson Street
CityBala Cynwyd
State/ProvincePA
Postal Code19004
CountryUSA
Phone Number610 949 9262
E-mail Addresscarolwisker@mac.com
Websitewww.carolwisker.com

First interest in hand papermaking process: 0

First piece of handmade paper: 1989

First handmade paper artwork: 1991

Beginning of active practice: 1991

Carol's Work in Hand Papermaking:

  1. Artist who uses papermaking for three-dimensional work
  2. Artist who uses papermaking for two-dimensional work

Influences on Carol's Work in Hand Papermaking:

Minor

Publications initially important to Carol:

Publications eventually important to Carol:

Countries where Carol's studied:

Raw materials used by Carol in Hand Papermaking:

Used Rarely

Chemicals used by Carol for cooking fibers in Hand Papermaking:

Used Routinely
Used Sometimes
Used Rarely

Tools and methods used by Carol for beating in Hand Papermaking:

Used Routinely
Used Sometimes
Used Rarely

Style of sheet forming used by Carol in Hand Papermaking:

Used Routinely
Used Sometimes
Used Rarely

Years teaching hand papermaking: null

Teaching formats used by Carol:

Used Routinely
Used Sometimes
Used Rarely

Carol's Income Contribution from Hand Papermaking:

  1. none

Narrative:

I am a mixed media artist working in two and three dimensions with a passion for fiber and a love of paper. I studied papermaking with Bobbie Lippman at Rittenhouse Town and at the Tockington Paper Studios in 1990’s and with Winnie Radalon. In 1990’s I had a solo exhibition of my pulp paintings and large hand made paper collages at the Esther Klein Gallery and in several other Philadelphia galleries. Life took over my art production for many years and I returned to painting and sculpture upon retiring from the Division Education at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. While there I incorporated hand paper making into much of the curriculum. Hand-cast paper is what I am presently using create the structures for many of my environmental sculptures. The simple, ovoid, convex shape used in many of my wall hung pieces came to be because several years ago I found a group of plastic display cases in a “going out of business sale” and I thought it reminiscent of the shape of the human face or mask and also symbolic of a place of growth such as a womb or pod. This plastic shape became a mold for an ongoing series that incorporate many other natural and manmade fibers.

Questions:

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